EU Requires Apple and Other Phone Makers to Use Easily Replaceable Batteries by 2027 to Reduce E-Waste

The European Union has made a new rule requiring Apple and other smartphone companies to change how their devices are built by 2027. The aim is to make it simpler for people or independent repair shops to remove and replace batteries. This is meant to reduce electronic waste from thrown-away devices and help the environment.

Currently, removing an iPhone battery is a complex process involving adhesive strips and specialized tools, which can take hours to complete.

The new design, anticipated to debut possibly with the iPhone 16, will feature a metal-encased battery that can be dislodged using electrically induced adhesive debonding, simplifying the replacement process significantly.

EU Requires Apple and Other Phone Makers to Use Easily Replaceable Batteries by 2027 to Reduce E-Waste
EU Requires Apple and Other Phone Makers to Use Easily Replaceable Batteries by 2027 to Reduce E-Waste

Despite these advancements, opening an iPhone remains challenging due to strong adhesives and screws, necessitating professional assistance for most users. However, the new regulation may eventually require Apple to make batteries fully user-replaceable by 2025, potentially eliminating the need for professional intervention altogether.

In response to regulatory pressure, Apple and other companies are expected to adapt their battery designs to comply with the EU’s sustainability goals. This shift not only promises convenience for consumers who prefer DIY solutions but also aligns with broader environmental initiatives to reduce electronic waste.

As Apple prepares for these changes, including anticipated updates like iOS18 and the integration of AI across its product line, the tech giant faces ongoing scrutiny and regulatory demands aimed at fostering a more sustainable electronics industry within the European market.

Michael Manua
Michael Manua
Michael, a seasoned market news expert with 29 years of experience, offers unparalleled insights into financial markets. At 61, he has a track record of providing accurate, impactful analyses, making him a trusted voice in financial journalism.
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